Take Action!

More than ever, we need our members and allies to be engaged in fighting for good jobs, fairness in the workplace, and retirement security.  The battles that have been won by unions, on behalf of ALL workers, dating back to the founding of this country are now under attack like never before.  Issues that were seemingly settled a century ago – on the basic rights to collectively bargain, on workplace safety and the minimum wage, even on child labor – are actually coming under legislative attack.  The recent Michigan Right to Work (for LESS!) law that was passed should be a wake-up call that winning rights for workers does not mean that we no longer need to Take Action to defend those rights!

Rapid Response / Take Action Blog Feed

What Happens After the Longest Government Shutdown in U.S. History?

Today could have been the beginning of 2019’s second federal government shutdown.  The historic and devastating 35-day federal shutdown which came to a temporary truce between Congress and the White House last month continues to have long-reaching and life-changing effects on federal workers and their families. Read More

Today In History: A Presidential Executive Order

On January 17, 1962, President John F. Kennedy issued Executive Order 10988, “Employee Management Cooperation in the Federal Sector”.  This order granted federal employees the right to engage in collective bargaining through labor unions.   President Kennedy understood the importance of workers having a seat at the table, especially those in public service.  “The participation of employees in the formation and implementation of employee policy and procedures affecting them contributes to the effective conduct of public business,” he noted.  57 years ago, the President of the United States respected the public servants of the federal government and demonstrated that respect through the acknowledgement and expansion of their rights as workers.  Today, more than 800,000 federal workers are being denied respect and their economic dignity.  Currently, 480,000 federal workers are being forced to work without pay. Read More