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Apprenticeship

Pennsylvania AFL-CIO Lauds Investment in Pennsylvanians in Governor Tom Wolf’s Budget

(HARRISBURG) Today, Governor Tom Wolf delivered the first Budget address of his second term. In 2019-2020, the Commonwealth has an opportunity to invest in the working men and women of Pennsylvania and create a sound pathway to the middle class.  By increasing investment in workforce development, decreasing bureaucratic inefficiency, and creating a support for working families to achieve economic success, our Commonwealth can become the go-to workforce for the jobs of the future.  Governor Wolf also understands that we must address workforce readiness and preparedness before Pennsylvanians enter the workforce.  The Pennsylvania AFL-CIO applauds the Governor’s proposed increases to education funding and his support of early childhood care and development.  Our Commonwealth needs to address all barriers to full and fair employment and this is an admirable start.  “This budget proposal builds on the findings of Governor Wolf’s Middle-Class Task Force and the PASmart program.  Today’s budget address connects the needs of the Commonwealth’s job market to the job-training and ‘earn while you learn’ apprenticeship programs that lift workers out of low-wage jobs,” remarked President Rick Bloomingdale. Read More

Two Important Workshops Discussed at 2019 Legislative Conference

At the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO Legislative Conference this week, union delegates had the opportunity to participate in two breakout sessions, taking a deeper dive into issues affecting working people across Pennsylvania.  The panel discussions connected economic and legislative policies and union-led solutions.  Over the course of 2019, the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO will be revisiting these issues, their many facets and their implications for the Commonwealth’s workers. Read More

Every Week Is Apprenticeship Week

Incredibly apparent in the current discussion surrounding apprenticeships in Pennsylvania and across the country is the need to discuss opportunities in the skilled trades with young people, particularly in high school.  Alternative forms of post-secondary education, need to be explored well before young adults are set to enter the workforce.  Read More