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The following article was published in our local newspaper the Altoona Mirror, editor was President Bob Kutz

All Politics is local: The measuring stick I use to judge a President is Does he Keep His Promises? President Trump promised in 2016 to bring back the manufacturing jobs we lost to China here in Pennsylvania. That has notr happened, as a matter of fact we have lost over 1000 good family wage substaining manufacturing jobs here in Blair County, since our President took office. Joe Biden WILL bring jobs back for us here at home, that is why we in the AFL-CIO have promised our support for the Biden/Harris ticket.  and we are asking you consider  for Congress Todd Rowley as our current congressman supports the Trump administration and look what that has done for our local workers. I would ask you consider voting as if your job depends on whom wins, as it truly does!

The Blair Bedford Labor Council was not able to conduct the NALC food drive this year which normally nets us 27 tons of food that we distribute to five area food banks.

THE BLAIR BEDFORD CENTRAL LABOR COUNCIL CONDUCTED OUR FIRST FACE TO FACE MEETING LAST EVENING WITH FIFTEEN DELEGATES IN ATTENDANCE.

Karima Howard has been a member of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 85 for 21 years. Born in Aliquippa, she is a union steel mill baby.

As Hurricane Harvey and its remnants bring unprecedented flooding and damage to a huge portion of Texas, working people in the state are going above and beyond their duties to help one another.

In January, I was invited to serve on President Donald Trump’s manufacturing council, along with my boss, AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka. At the time, I was deputy chief of staff at the AFL-CIO (the largest federation of trade unions in America) and a spokesperson for the organization on trade, manufacturing, and economic policy. President Trumka and I agreed to serve because we believed — and still do — that working people should have a voice in crucial government decisions affecting their jobs, their lives, and their families.

On Tuesday, President Donald Trump stood in the lobby of his tower on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan and again made excuses for bigotry and terrorism, effectively repudiating the remarks his staff wrote a day earlier in response to the white supremacist violence in Charlottesville, Va.
AFL-CIO president, Richard Trumka, published a new column on Huffington Post. He writes how Hillary roots for working people and why working people are championing her in tonight's presidential debate.

One night at his UPS job, Tefere Gebre's co-worker handed him some union material. 

“He told me that I’d get health care and vacation and other benefits by filling it out. I said, ‘Are you serious?’ I thought, ‘Hmm. Everyone should have that.’”

Tefere, the executive vice president of the AFL-CIO, has been a proud union member for most of his life, valuing the freedom of people to come together in union.

Growing up in rural Kentucky, Augusta Thomas witnessed the extreme measures elected officials would take to prevent African-American men from voting.
Culinary worker Brittany Bronson talks not only about the benefits of joining her union, but also about the opportunities being part of a unionized workforce offer women, particularly women who have long careers in the workforce.

Anniversaries can be celebratory or somber. Today we celebrate the 51st anniversary of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and it is the kind of anniversary in which we hail the success of the act, while also acknowledging the deficiencies in our democracy that make the full act necessary.